Generator 21 masthead. -> MY GLASS HOUSE

A spaceholder

All Saints Day/City of the Saints

Rod Amis - Unbound

To read this article in Deutsch, Francaise, Italiano, Portuguese, Espanol, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, copy and paste the complete URL("http://www.generator21.net/mars286.htm") and enter it in the box after you click through.

The World's Magazine: generator21.net

Event # 288: TRICKS & TREATS

AMERICAN DREAMS
DAY ONE
G21 BARNES & NOBLE SEARCH ENGINE
G21 AFRICA
G21 ASIA
G21 Daily Cartoon
G21 Digital Internet Postcards
JOIN OUR MAILING LIST. You'll be glad you did. Surveys that affect our look and feel and much more. Be part of the In-Crowd!

G21 E-MAIL NEWSLETTER


HOT LINKS
IRISH EYES
MEMOIRS OF THE INFO AGE
MY GLASS HOUSE
MYTHVILLE PROJECT
NY STATE
POWERSSOUND
RDR
TABLOID HART
THE SEX COLUMN
VOX POPULI

Search our Site:

sitemap

RECOMMENDED DAILY REQUIREMENT ARCHIVES.
MEMOIRS OF THE INFO AGE ARCHIVES.

G21 STUFF: SHOW THE PRIDE. Why wear that T-shirt or sweats from Nike when you can sport the splendiferous G21 blue logo? Let people know you're In The Know with G21 gear. Follow that link and find it here. Thank you so much!!!


LAST WEEK's EDITION

MEET THE G-CREW! These are the people behind this jam-band every week.

HOME



TABLE OF CONTENTS & BACK ISSUES

Our 'Palladin' logo. NEW ORLEANS - 28 October, 2001: Despite my dear friend Dragana's plea that I stay here in New Orleans, it's getting more difficult by the day. I can't seem to dig myself out of the hole here, no matter how hard I try. People who were born here, like my friend Carlos, and people who have lived here for years, like my roommate Caio, say that everybody is vetted by suffering when first acclimating themselves to this town. But I've given it months now and the old college try. I've started to apply for jobs in real American cities. That paralegal job I thought I had supposedly sent me my paycheck --- FROM HERE IN NEW ORLEANS --- a week ago last Thursday. Know what? It hasn't arrived yet. Third World .

Oh yeah, the New Orleans Saints lost to the Atlanta Falcons last week. THE ATLANTA FALCONS! We're talking a team who had tanked in their last two games. The Falcons fans left the SuperDome talking Big Trash: "How you like me now, punks?"

It was painful for the local folks, so it's good that New Orleans won today...

Not that that has improved my quality of life one iota. But people like it when you talk about sport. It's non-threatening.

I have been reading a lot in order to keep my mind off my troubles. I have finished Ivo Andric's The Bridge On the Drina and The Days of the Consuls this week, and am deep into Milovan Vitezovic's King Petar's Socks already. The translation of the latter is inelegant after the wonderful work I experienced in the Andric books. I shall know the entire history of Serbia before I am done...

All of this has left me at lose ends. Beginning tomorrow, with Halloween coming up, we have four more houseguests coming in. The last two, Caio's friends from California, Tula and Joe and their dog, Cricket, just left last night. Matt returned from San Diego tonight, where he picked up his truck and the belongings that had lanquished in San Francisco (short side trip) since June of 2000. There are boxes and garbage bags everywhere and tomorrow there are more people with more luggage...

LISTEN: My friend Dove, the magic Christian, does not like Halloween because All Saints Day is important to him. I wonder what he must think about my living a city where every saint has a loa as its alter ego ("Its Shadow," Ric would say.) That is the nature of the town. Snoop Dog was here in New Orleans on Saturday for Voodoo Fest. The cemeteries in this town are legend. New Orleans had to build those fancy mausolea above ground because we are below sea level. Back in the Day, if there was a heavy rain, coffins would float down the streets. That's when they figured out that subterranean interment wouldn't work here.

When I lived on the edge of the world, in San Francisco, people talked about waiting for The Big One. That meant an earthquake. Here in New Orleans The Big One is a hurricane that will put our houses under water. The National Weather Service says that one day it must come. Another city thriving on its own fatalism.

The Fauberg Marigny, where I live now, is one of the highest places in the city, but there are pictures in an historical archive of houses here being under water.

Visions of people sitting on top of their houses as the rats swim by, waiting for rescue.
Helicopters lifting people out of the flood zone. But that won't happen tomorrow.

The gate at Romuliana. The city is gearing up for Mardi Gras in February. People say New Orleans is already bouncing back from the hit it took after September 11th and our airport is one of the busiest in the nation, after JFK. People hope the Saints -- the football team this time -- will play in the Super Bowl (sport again!) since it will be at the SuperDome this year.

Like most cities I've lived in, I've gotten into the history. It's hard not to, if you're of the historical bent. I still remember Robin Miller regaling me with the stories of Baltimore's history, the old German breweries, the influx of the Irish and the inventors who settled in the outskirts, among them Benjamin Benneker. And Dragan taking me through the center of Belgrade, built on the old Roman road, as we made our way to the fortress at the confluence of the Saava and the Danube, the border between the Ottoman Empire and the Austro-Hungarian. In Cairo, my friend Ez el-Din Shawkat and I talked of the days of the Mameluks. Every city has its story and each story defines a nation and a people.
All of these cities are mine, I guess, while none of them are. And now I must prepare myself to leave another one. "When will you stop?" my mother asked me.

"When I am home," I replied.

THINGS I HATE THIS WEEK

1. The slow progress I've had in New Orleans.

2. My lowering motivation.

3. Waiting to dig my way out of debt.

4. Worrying about my return to Serbia.
Thanks for coming back this week.

"Work like you don't need the money,
"Love like you've never been hurt,
"Dance like no one is watching..."
Rod


This is another Web site made on a Macintosh.

Apple Computer's Think Different logo.

ROD AMIS has published this magazine since 1990. It first appeared as a hardcopy 'Zine. In March, 1996, he launched it here on the Web. Rod was a Contributing Editor at Suite101.com, where he wrote the " 'Net Publishing" feature. His work has been featured in the San Francisco Bay Guardian Online, NRV8, and at WebLab's Reality Check site. Rod was also a contributing writer on technology for Faulkner Information Services. He wrote Web issues for MethodFive.com's Hyper newsletter.

Rod was a columnist for the Andover News Network, where he wrote over two hundred articles on web design and development issues. He was also principal writer and Editor for IT Manager's Journal, where he reviewed technology issues weekly, producing 383 editorials. He became the Managing Editor for Electronic Mail/Newsletter Publications at Andover.net at the end of February, 2000, and left in September of the same year. He was a contributing writer for ACCESS magazine, which appears both on- and offline for 10 million readers in 100 newspapers like the San Francisco Chronicle, New York Post, Boston Herald, Austin American-Statesman, Denver Post and Orlando Sentinel, among others. Rod was the US reporter for Silicon.com, a division of Network Multimedia Television in London, UK, reaching 3.5 million European readers, until May, 2001.

Rod lives in New Orleans, Louisiana, right now. The new home of the magazine. But he plans to return to Serbia next year.

He continues to be committed to integrity, chastity and a dose of humility.


| HOME | THE PREVIOUS GLASS HOUSE | THE NEXT GLASS HOUSE |


CREDITS || AWARDS || SEARCH ENGINES || LINKS ||
VOX POPULI is YOUR PAGE to talk back to us. I'm glad you're not bashful. Keep those cards and e-mails comin', Kids!

Search our Site:

sitemap


RETURN TO TOP OF PAGE


Animated Contact ImageOur Editor does listen!


© 2001, GENERATOR 21.

E-mail your comments. We always like to hear from you. Send your kudos, brickbats and suggestions to info@generator21.net.