Generator 21 masthead. COVER -> RECOMMENDED DAILY REQUIREMENT

A spaceholder



RDR Logo.

RECOMMENDED DAILY REQUIREMENT

DATELINE: 14 July, 2000

Transmitted by: Rod Amis, USA

The World's Magazine: generator21.net

Event # 223: TERMINAL ANGST

AMERICAN DREAMS
The Barnes & Noble Search Engine
CARTOONS BY GASPIRTZ
CULTURECAST
DAY ONE
G21 Digital Internet Postcards
G21 E-MAIL NEWSLETTER
G21 ASIA
G21 LATIN AMERICA
G21 NEWS
HOT LINKS
IRISH EYES
MEMOIRS OF THE INFO AGE
MY GLASS HOUSE
POWERSSOUND
RDR
TABLOID HART
VOX POPULI

EVERYONE LOVES "RECOMMENDED DAILY REQUIREMENT" but can't find their favorite article. No More! Here's *another* link to the complete ARCHIVES.

LAST WEEK's EDITION

For Deep Background visit the G21-Barnes & Noble Shop

OR get great books at the G21 BARNES & NOBLE SEARCH ENGINE

HOME


Discover the MOIA Discussion List

To read this article in Deutsch, Francaise, Italiano, Portuguese, Espanol, copy and paste the complete URL("http://www.generator21.net/daily0714.htm") and enter it in the box after you click through.

RDR logo.A MAN OF GOD - There were three points of synchronicity in my life yesterday which I feel bear reflection. First, my friend Catherine, in Delaware, directed me to a "Fresh Air" interview with former-nun Karyn Armstrong about Ms. Armstrong's recent book The Battle for God. In the book, Ms. Armstrong posits the thesis that the resurgence of fundamentalism in Christianity, Judaism and Islam today does not harken back to the past, but is the product of anxieties created by our modernity.

Ms. Armstrong's position in the book is that modern fundamentalists, like modern nationalists, are battling with what they perceive as a threat against their personal sovereignty. She suggests that they see the rush toward corporate homogenization and secularism as a threatening sign of the Eschaton (the "end of days" in religio-speak.)

I found the interview interesting and thoughtful, if a bit academic.

The second point was a film I watched on the TRUE cable network, chronicling the activities of Monsignor Hugh O'Flannery during the second World War. The Monsignor risked his life, repeatedly, in order to save the lives of thousands of Jews and escaped Allied prisoners-of-war in Italy during the conflict with the Nazis. His heroism and love of his fellow humans as portrayed in the film was moving and informing. At the end of the film, reading how the Monsignor made weekly visits to the Nazi Colonel who had been his nemesis for years, who had made numerous attempts on his life for years, in the latter's prison cell, I could not but come away with the sense that I had learned about a true man of God.

Rod Amis
Photo of Rod Amis.
Apparently, so did the Colonel. He converted to Catholicism, while still serving his life term for war crimes, during one of Monsignor O'Flannery's visits in 1959...

It takes a huge heart to not only show love to those who care about you and share common cause, but also to actually, in practice show love to those who hate you.

Both these points, incidents, reignited an underlying concern of mine: the wrestling I continue to do with the angel of spirituality. Long-term readers of The World's Magazine have trod this ground with me before and know that it is not an easy issue for me. These two incidents resumed my focus on areas I believe paramount for assessment of ones own orientation to the spiritual. The third is most telling.

Father Theodore Hesburgh of Notre Dame University receives the highest civilian honor the United States can give on 13 July for his years of humanitarian service. In an interview with the NewsHour's Gwen Ifill on 12 July, he said that central to his belief about serving humanity was that one must demonstrate three C's:

Compassion is a word you find a lot in the G21 over its years of publication. We trust that we have been committed to this ideal and competent to explain the focus on the ideal to you, our readers.

I was especially moved when Father Hesburgh explained (using the parable of The Good Samaritan) that real compassion requires action. It is not enough, the Father reminded us in his interview, to feel sympathy for the beaten man lying in the ditch. Like The Good Samaritan, we must have the commitment to stop, the competence to go down to offer him help, pour wine to staunch his wounds, use our olive oil to soothe them, and then be willing to carry him to safety and healing even if it means we have to walk the rest of the way into the next village because we have placed him on our only donkey!

These three incidents, events, whatever you wish to call them, moved me because --- try as I have --- they highlighted how little I have offered in my own life to the lives of others. I look back at my work with refugees to this country, to indigent children, to the homeless and mentally ill, and see that all the things I complained about, my so-called sacrifices, were small in comparison to what so many others have offered... I see my current weekly advocacy for human rights and social justice as hollow compared to those who have put their very lives on the line for humanity.

I still do not want the angel to escape without blessing me, even if it mean he must break my hip...

But in the face of what Monsignor O'Flannery had to offer, in the face of what so many others unnamed have done, I feel that my efforts are paltry. It is easy to send checks to people all over the planet, for example, who call out to you in their misery when you are a servant --- as I am --- of the corporate hegemony. It is even easy to give your time and resources to the less-fortunate when you are blessed --- as I once was --- to have access to the political establishment.

But how many of us step down into the ditch and place that injured man on our donkey and carry him to care?

Not many.

Even among the best of my friends, I see and hear too often how one must take care of oneself first; how the sins of the world cannot become an obsession because they cannot be addressed by one person; how taking care of oneself is the best way to take care of the world. AND I MILITATE AGAINST THIS REASONING BECAUSE I KNOW IT MAKES NO SENSE!!!

The best way to take care of the world IS to take care of the world, not oneself, I believe.

The best way to take care of the world is for each of us to accept our responsibility to care for each other.

I have no pressing need to eat another steak...

The lesson I took away from these three events of yesterday was that I might not be deluding myself in believing that the way to change the world is one person at a time. You are reading this alone, after all...

IF, even for an instant, I can help you step away from single-selfishness and toward competent, committed, active compassion I have done my part today.


This week's Poll - What are your thoughts on spiritual issues on the Web? Vote now!

RDR RECOMMENDED SITE OF THE DAY: Some countries use the Internet in ways that can only be considered evil. This Washington Post seems to say as much in our view.


Try out Internet Radio the way we like it:

WinTel users, click on "Preferences" to get 30 additional radio channel selections. Macintosh Users (we love you!) you get the additional channels by surfing over to the Windows Media web site.

Our floral line.

Hey, Kids! Why not submit your own thoughts, rants, reminiscences, anecdotes or jokes to G21 RECOMMENDED DAILY REQUIREMENT? It's easy! Just send an e-mail note to OUR EDITOR, with subject line "RDR." Thanks and a tip of the hat!
+++ THE RDR Archives +++

RETURN TO TOP OF PAGE


HotBot Search for

MY GLASS HOUSE | THE PREVIOUS EVENT | COMING ATTRACTIONS | THE WRITERS/GUIDELINES |  



© 2000, GENERATOR 21.

E-mail your comments. We still like to hear from you. Send your snide remarks to info@generator21.net.